The road through Saudi was goooood!

Saudi Arabia 6/11/11, pics by Darren, words by both:

A constant chug through the desert brought us to Suakin (near Port Sudan) by the following evening. No mishaps along the way gave hope and it felt good to be finally on the road again and making positive progress towards our exit from Africa and starting a new chapter in the Middle East. The following day was spent in the Port waiting for our ferry to Jeddah and processing numerous papers for emigration and copious more in order to export our bikes from Sudan. Russ in fact counted 7 different offices were visited for each purpose.

There are very few motorists taking the route through Saudi Arabia but by chance a Swiss couple loaded their truck upon the same ferry as us. Being with 4 wheels, they had secured a 3 day visa in Khartoum (only place available) and had little problem with boarding along with the multitude of pilgrims bound for Mecca and the Haj. Russ and I set up camp on the top deck and it was here we met them. Their first question was to ask how we had got hold of our visa as they understood it wasn’t possible for motorcyclists. After explaining our story we also shared our concerns of turning up in Jeddah wIth bikes. ‘If we can just get there I’m sure we can work it out.. I mean, whats the worst that can happen? We can’t be deported back to Sudan at least.’ Russ and I were feeling quietly confident and planned to go through Saudi immigration showing no sign of having bikes. We would then deal with customs after our entry stamps were firmly in our passports. Of course, we were still concerned to what we may happen and this was exacerbated when the Swiss told us a offical on the boat, who had our passports, was looking for us. Lets try to avoid being found before the boat leaves. The ferry left shortly after mid night.

Tramp camping outside Saudi customs

Arriving into Jeddah was exciting. Almost a forbidden country for tourism meant adventure awaited. The swiss bid us luck – needed luck. We had to leave our bikes on the ferry and catch a bus to the immigration which suited our plan. An hour or two of paper work and waiting produced no questions of our mode of transport and with big smiles on our faces, entry into the kingdom of Saudi Arabia was granted. Now for customs and the first thing we were told was that we couldn’t ride our bikes in Saudi. We were not put off and replied ‘Of course we can. It’s in our Visas.’ The truth was they just didn’t know as they didn’t seem to have experience of motorcycles. As we attended office after office a question mark remained to whether we would be riding through Saudi or not. The Saudi officials were very friendly and made it easy for us to remain positive. The Swiss couple, however, were soon told that they wouldn’t be driving through the Kingdom as their truck was right hand drive and required a truck on which to truck their truck.. I suppose it would have to be a rather large truck to do that. I felt bad for them as their downed mouths conveyed their disappointment.

The last office we went to was the office of the official who first told us we couldn’t ride in Saudi. He wrote our temporary licences then smiled as he welcomed us into his country. YES!!.. Two very happy chaps picked up their bikes in the area of inspection where they had been delivered. From being completely unsure of what to expect and at the worst fearing deportation we were now feeling blessed to have achieved the impossible.

Street tramping in Jeddah

The sun had fallen and with the infamous dangerous drivers of Saudi speeding around the city of Jeddah we decided to camp outside the port and start our journey at first light. We would have 3 days from then to drive the 750 miles to the Jordanian border. Thats enough time to do a spot of sight-seeing if we rode a decent distance the first day. I went to get take away chicken to share with the disheartened Swiss before we peacefully slept ’till morning. They went to a hotel after being quoted 1400 USD for their transport. Ouchh!

Saudi beach camp

With our successful entry into Saudi we were excited and looking forward to travelling through such an untrodden-by-tourist country. We made our way north on massive motorways after Darren had skillfully negotiated the Arabic signs and junctions of Jeddah. I had to continually check my mirrors on these roads as they all drive enormous V8 trucks and fly past us, even a lorry over took us at 100kmh! We made really good progress on the first day and it felt good, despite the hours of riding in a straight line, we were on the road in Saudi – brilliant! There were a few road checks to go through, and being such a novelty on Saudi roads we were pulled over, but we had the visas and Saudi licence to keep everyone happy. Its getting quite hard now to explain our route through Africa and into the Middle East, but at one police stop we got the chance to explain over Arabic coffee and dates in the captain’s office. Again we are made to feel like very welcome guests in SA as we banter with the traffic cops, this was rather nice, I like this off the trail travel. The second nights accommodation was a nice little beach location, just over 450 miles north of Jeddah, with a camp fire and noodles under the stars. Our first time to cover over 400 miles in a day, but no whisky to celebrate, it’s the home of Islam of course.

Enjoying the freedom of Saudi

As we’d done so well yesterday we could afford to take it easy today so we headed a few 100km to the coast where we could see the Sinai peninsula and the Egyptian resort of Sharm El Sheikh across the red sea. Here we found a nice spot on the beach with a pill-box (gun turret) for shelter from the strong breeze. We took a dip in the Red Sea and met a group of lads from Riyadh who were very interested in the bikes and quickly gave us cans of Pepsi and a bag of chocolate croissants and biscuits, sweet. Then as we waited for the sun to set the coast guard came along to say hi, see what we were up to, invited us over to the base for dinner, Arabic coffee, dates etc. So we went along and enjoyed lamb, lamb soup and flat bread with the officers, explaining as best we could to the one English understanding officer our trip and what we were doing in their country.

'Our' pill-box!

Ok they checked our passports (they couldn’t believe it), but we were made to feel very welcome and felt like special guests! That night we rather fancied camping in their pill-box and once back from dinner we made our beds and settled down to a film. However, at least three sets of officers came by to ask us to sleep in the base but we insisted we were ok in the bunker and had already made beds. Reluctantly they agreed, and the following morning we could see why… Two of them were camped outside of our bunker all night long to make sure we were ok, or that we didn’t cause any trouble in a gun turret!

Who'd have thought...

In the morning we went over to the base for breakfast with the captain, more lamb and bread, but it was good, and Arabic coffee is very nice. We said our goodbye’s, hugs, Salam Alaikum’s and were back on the road to Jordan as this was the final day on our visa. The road north from here took us over a mountain range and our first taste of cold for a long time, we even had to stop and put a layer on. I’m not looking forward to travelling through Europe in winter, we’ve been used to the warm for too long. But I want to get home more so we’ll just have to get cold. All too soon Saudi came to an end and we were through to Jordanian customs, it had been a fun few days enjoying the Saudi landscape and hospitality and the whole route felt like it had been blessed a long time ago.

Sunset over Egypt

Comments
  1. Kelly Hatch says:

    What an accomplishment! You are one of very few outsiders that have seen the roads you have just traveled on! Way to stick it through and get creative :)

  2. Catrin T-J says:

    Oh I’m so excited your route went well, it does sound so blessed :) love it that you slept on a beach and in a little bunker, I bet these mad times are coming normal to you now while the rest of us sit and read in wonder and amazement!! :) Your making the distraction from my essays a wonderful time…thank you!!! :)
    Take care guys and all the best for your following journeys, hope its not too cold!!
    Cat xx

    • Hi Cat, thanks for the message, was a great time in Saudi, but now we’re in tourist country, bus loads of them in Petra, but it is a beautiful place, enjoying the sights. Getting colder now, we’re just not used to it, home soon I hope. God bless. Russ

  3. Chris Moody says:

    Brilliant !! I can’t wait for you two to get home. Although I am not sure that our hospitality will match that of all the nationalities and tribes of your travels, but it will be so good to see you both home and safe. Arabic coffee all round then !!

  4. Peter & Victoria says:

    Brilliant. Your such cheeky buggers. Saudi didn’t see you coming. Hope to see you soon.

  5. Kris says:

    Amazing! Seems like things worked out way better than anybody expected… True blessing.. How is Jordan? xxx

  6. malcolm (dad) says:

    hey boys.
    i love what you have achieved, sorry been out of contact but back now and all is well.
    every day you are on our minds, now bloody BMW should wake up as you are maybee the first in history to bike this.. that is apart from moses and it was never proved that the triumph he came down the mountain with existed.
    bless your every day and may you reach the goal for all of us.
    love mal(dad), loulou, natasha, natalia and of course nathen and mama.

    • I was wondering what had hapened to you.. Suadi was definatly worth the effort and risk.. loved every min of it. Hows Dar. Got youir house yet? whats schemes are you up to.. maybe you should write a blog too. God bless you and family D

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