Archive for the ‘Jordan’ Category

Russell writes, pics by Darren 18/11/11:

Sunset over Wadi Musa

After our tiring yet exhilarating ride through Saudi it was a welcome break to arrive at Aqaba, a Red Sea resort town in south Jordan, however, it was a little strange suddenly seeing multitudes of holiday makers. I had quite liked being the only foreign tourist and now during Eid festival all the Jordanian families had flocked to the slither of coast on the Red Sea. Our little bubble had burst. We camped overlooking the Red Sea and Egypt, however, the prices had doubled for the Eid holidays. Darren took the opportunity to join a few other campers to dive the reefs that line the shore on Jordans Red Sea stretch, I took the opportunity to look at my fuel injector with the aid of a very helpful Dutch biker. A few days of rest and relaxation were welcomed, and a good chance to meet other travellers (including 2 bikers) and NGO workers, swapping stories and making friends while being treated to a glass or few of Jordanian wine.

Inside Petra

I even met a lovely Romanian chap, Razvan, who was born in Galati and whose parents go to the same Bethesda church as our charity, amazing! He gave me his gran’s home-made jam and a tipple brewed by his father to celebrate our meeting. We will have to make a visit another time, but its great how we’re making friends all over the world. The two bikers who had both come south through Syria said it went fine, so it got us wondering, maybe this way won’t be so bad after all, and it would mean we could call by Lebanon. The cost and availability of visas for those not obtaining them in their own country are our only concerns.

Petra's entrance Siq

The Treasury entrance

Next on our unusually touristic trail was the ancient city of Petra. So shocked by the expense of a day ticket we decided to take out own tour, however, this ment missing the main attraction, the entrance to Petra. Our route took us scrambling over rocks and into ravine to find a sneaky way in. We ending up stuck on some rocks with the Bedouin entrance visible but no way of getting ourselves safely down. Sheepishly we were guided down by a Bedouin shepherd boy who embarrassed us with his bare foot climbing skills. To see Petra today is quite something, but in its day it must have been quite amazing. Dwellings hollowed from the sandstone, and not just caves these were square-cut rooms with side rooms and ornate facades. Making the climb up to and looking out over the Treasury (the Indiana Jones one) is quite special as you stand above such an impressive monument of masonry.

Worth visiting from several angles

An impressive Monestary

The next worthy sight is a bit of a trek up to the Monastery where you can look out over to the Dead Sea and into Israel. Its worth spending some time with this one as its possibly more impressive than the Treasury , they must have cut back a whole mountainside to reveal this masterpiece. The trouble we’re having these days is that the nights are drawing in and by 5 we’ve lost all our light, so we had to speed back to the proper entrance to see it at all. The entrance is a 1.2 km long canyon or siq with water channels for the city’s supply running its length, and with the grand finale of the Treasury, in its day, I think it had to be one of the most impressive city entrances.With all the skill a man possesses, I still think the natural structures out shine mans best efforts.

Looking over to Jordan Valley

Dropping down into the Jordan valley and the Dead Sea was breathtaking with its views across to the promised land, Israel. I ts amazing to think that thousands of years ago Moses stood on these heights looking across at what we were seeing, it was actually quite exciting. At 428 meters below sea level its the Dead Sea is the lowest place on Earth and we just had to go for a dip. The shore of the sea is encrusted with white salt crystals and the water swirling with saline. Once you’re in it’s just surreal, you really do float quite high, you just can’t push yourself or anyone else down.

Boiuyant on the Dead Sea

Its not table salt sadly

We had quite a bit of fun playing around, ‘standing’ in the super dense solution. After a wash off we were on the way to Mt Nebo when we came across 4 burly bikers on some very bling cruisers. A group of friends called the Jordan Bikers meet up on the weekend for a cruise, sunset views over Israel and a gourmet burger at the 5 star Marriott on the Dead Sea. They were a very friendly and welcoming bunch, and soon they took us under their wing. We looked like a pair of scruffians next to their bikes, they were so bling and ours were so dented, but that didn’t stop them inviting us to join them in the Marriott.

Rockin up at the Marriott

It felt a little strange in the middle of this unusual procession as we were ushered to a 5 star hotel, but we had a great meal and a great time with the very big-hearted guys from the Jordan Bikers. A big thank you . They guided us to Amman and directed us to downtown where I tried navigating for a change, to a hostel in the guide-book, and boy it’s not easy, no wonder I let Darren do it, its his 6th sense I think.

I didn’t hold out any hope really for fixing my fuel problems in Amman, but I set off to try. I’d discovered my filter was blocked and needed replacing but really didn’t want to delay things by ordering from the UK. Eventually I found a bike mechanic who punctured my filter trying to clean it so he had to bodge a fix. A standard bike filter, a pressure regulator from a Toyota and some extra pipe-work got me going, well, sort of. I need a BMW filter really, but it should get me home.

Looking small with the Jordan Bikers

Our route home: we have decided to take the ferry from Ashdod in Israel to Savona in north Italy. This probably isn’t the cheapest option but with doubts over getting a Syrian visa it’s one of a very few options. It also means we miss some cold weather riding through Turkey and eastern Europe which will be a relief as we’re still used to an African climate. A new trip to Romania next summer would be a much better time to visit our children’s charity in Galati. This could put us back in the UK for early December 🙂 and much celebrating!!!

But now we must exit Jordan with its glorious landscapes, sites of antiquity and the famous Arabic hospitality, and hopefully exchange it all for an Israeli / Palestinian one. I’m looking forward to it, and a step closer to home!